How to make sausage with electric meat grinder?

The real sausage is an emulsion of noble meat, fat, spices, and water. The primary difference between a sausage and a sausage resides in the proportions of these ingredients. The emulsification techniques transform the mixture into a homogeneous and creamy mass, often aerated by the type of process adopted. Here, we will guide you on all about making sausage with best electric meat grinder.

Procedures

Making sausage is a lengthy process, but it is not difficult with the electric meat grinder.  The temperature is necessary so that the fat does not dissolve and separate from the emulsion during the process. Always keep everything cold, and this is valid for the dishes, equipment, meat, fat and liquids added to the recipe.

Leave the mixture in the freezer before using them. It is recommended to leave the meat and fat in the fridge and use them when they are almost frozen. Salt is added at a rate of 10 to 20 grams per kilogram of meat and fat. Remember that, with salt, it is always better to miss for less and then get it right at the end, because the reverse is much more complicated to correct.

It may seem unnecessary, but the idea is to salt the meat a day in advance. The salt, providing flavor, is incorporated into the protein. It helps in the emulsion, retaining fat and water. Then, clean, chop the meat with a 1cm diced knife, and add the salt a day in advance.

Emulsifying

Emulsifying is a process in which a sausage turns into a sausage. Remove the meat from the freezer, place it in the electric meat grinder with the cutting blade, and keep everything well chilled. Add the remaining spices and process at high speed for 4 minutes. Then, add the recipe liquid very cold and gradually, as it helps to keep everything fresh. Try to keep the temperature always below 12ºC. As you process, note that the mixture should be very pasty and homogeneous.

Embedding the sausage

This is perhaps the most challenging task at home, as the sausage dough is soft and sticky. The ideal is to use specific equipment, but it isn’t straightforward for someone to have one at home. Then, as an alternative, it is possible to use a large funnel to place the filling inside the casing (casing). The natural casing is usually preserved in salt, so it is necessary to rinse with plenty of water. The collagen gut is more natural to work with, but less digestive.

Supermarket sausage had a making cellulose casing, and after cooking, before being packaged, they have this wrapper removed, as it is not edible. More expensive commercial sausages, like the Vienna type, are wrapped in a collagen casing. The ideal casing for sausages is the lamb casing, but it is little used commercially because it is more expensive and challenging to work with. For those just starting, the suggestion is to look for a collagen casing and, later, when you are familiar with the process, move on to the thin porcine or mutton housing.

Sausage dough test

To test whether the dough tastes like it, take a portion, wrap it in plastic wrap and place it in almost boiling water (80º C) for a few minutes. Take it out and try it. Set the seasoning and salt if you notice any problems. If the filling has become floury, shattering, or with grease sticking to the plastic, it will be a bad sign, as the emulsion has probably gone wrong.

Regardless of what the wrapper is, please insert it into the funnel outlet tube, tie the end with string, or tie a knot, and start passing the sausage dough into the wrapper. Every 10 cm, rotate the casing a few times or match it with string to form the long separations typical of sausages.

Cooking

For the sausage cooking, heat water in a pan between 80º C and 90º C, that is, without boiling. If you have a culinary thermometer, monitor the interior temperature of one of the sausages and, when it is at 70º C (around 15 and 20 minutes), remove them from the hot water and place them in another container with cold water for about 5 minutes to stop cooking. It’s ready for consumption!